Age, Biography and Wiki

Khalik Allah was born on 1985 in Brookhaven, NY, is an American filmmaker and photographer.

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Age35 years old
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Born
Birthday
BirthplaceBrookhaven, NY
Nationality
NY

Khalik Allah Height, Weight & Measurements

At 35 years old, Khalik Allah height not available right now. We will update Khalik Allah’s Height, weight, Body Measurements, Eye Color, Hair Color, Shoe & Dress size soon as possible.

Physical Status
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Dating & Relationship status

He is currently single. He is not dating anyone. We don’t have much information about He’s past relationship and any previous engaged. According to our Database, He has no children.

Family
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Khalik Allah Net Worth

He net worth has been growing significantly in 2018-19. So, how much is Khalik Allah worth at the age of 35 years old? Khalik Allah’s income source is mostly from being a successful Filmmaker. He is from NY. We have estimated Khalik Allah’s net worth, money, salary, income, and assets.

Net Worth in 2020$1 Million – $5 Million
Salary in 2019Under Review
Net Worth in 2019Pending
Salary in 2019Under Review
HouseNot Available
CarsNot Available
Source of IncomeFilmmaker

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Timeline

2015

Allah released the film for free on YouTube and Vimeo in 2015 for a short time, before removing it at the request of True/False Film Festival so it could show there. It has since been shown on the film festival and college circuits in the US and Europe.

2013

Black Mother was made in Jamaica, its subjects are holy men, sex workers, beggars, hawkers and children. It was made in the same fashion as Field Niggas: “visual portraits of people on the street – filming their faces for several seconds as they pose as if for a still camera” – with a soundtrack out of synch with the images.

2012

Described by The Village Voice as “more a woozy experience you press through than an ethnographic study you watch, Khalik Allah’s hour-long non-narrative street-life doc Field Niggas stands as the most striking sort of urban portraiture.” The film comprises observational footage of, and interviews and discussions with, people at night around the notorious Harlem street corner of 125th Street and Lexington Avenue in New York City. Its subjects are predominantly African American, experiencing poverty, homelessness, drug addiction (use of the synthetic cannabinoid K2 is prevalent), physical infirmities and harassment from the police; people with “a hunger to have their voices heard”. The police are also portrayed.

Souls Against the Concrete consists of Allah’s photographs of people at night around the intersection of 125th Street and Lexington Avenue in New York City, between 2012 and 2016.

2010

He started making movies at age 19 with a Hi-8 video camera. His first feature film, Popa Wu: A 5% Story (2010), was a “normal, talking heads documentary” about Popa Wu, “Wu-Tang Clan’s de facto spiritual advisor” and a member of Five-Percent Nation. It took four years to make. Allah took up still photography in 2010.

1985

Khalik Allah (born 1985) is an American filmmaker and photographer. His film Field Niggas (2015) and book Souls Against the Concrete (2017) depict people who inhabit the notorious Harlem corner of 125th Street and Lexington Avenue in New York City. His film Black Mother (2018) depicts people on the island of Jamaica. “He favours visual portraits of people on the street – filming their faces for several seconds as they pose as if for a still camera.” Allah lives in New York City.

1971

Allah used slow speed colour film, usually intended for daylight photography, for its high contrast, with a 35 mm SLR camera from 1971. Because of photographing at night using available light, he used a fast manual focus normal lens at a large aperture (hence the shallow depth of field).

1963

The film’s title is taken from “Message to the Grass Roots”, a public speech delivered by human rights activist Malcolm X in 1963, “extolling the spirit of rebellion among outdoor slaves.” Allah was director, cinematographer, and editor. It was made in summer 2014, filmed in slow motion using a hand held camera and available light. Allah recorded the sound of his conversations with people separately to filming them, so the sound is not synchronised with the images. Apart from his cinematography, it includes surveillance footage of the strangulation of Eric Garner as well as the overdubbed sound of field hollers by a 1950s chain gang.